The 3×3 speed cube is an amazing puzzle that we can turn back to day after day. When we’ve had a long day or a great time, there is something that we can all enjoy and love about coming back to our speed cube.

However, there are some moments when we want to branch out and learn something new as opposed to refining something we have mastered pretty well. Others have felt the same way and have answered with strange shaped puzzles, new challenges, and the larger cubes. Now that there are so many options, how do we go about learning them?

How To Transition To Larger Cubes

If you are familiar with a 3×3, then you will be able to understand the larger cubes pretty quickly because the concept is very similar. The size may change, but they both have the same amount of side and they are not shape-shifting. You won’t have to worry about them being too far apart in differences.

The color scheme on a 3×3 is exactly the same, and moving up to a 4×4, 5×5, or even higher will still have the same algorithms that you applied with a 3×3. You’ll end up having to learn only a handful of algorithms as opposed to relearning a whole new puzzle. Gotta love the cubic similarities!

The size may change, but they both have the same amount of side and they are not shape-shifting.

What Method To Use

There are many methods that you could use if you want to explore all of the options available, but the easiest and most common method is the Reduction Method. This involves breaking the larger cube down to a much larger 3×3. The process is to match up all of your centers, pair up your edges, and then solving as if it were a typical 3×3 speed cube. Although it may sound simple, it does definitely takes a lot of determination and practice, but you will get it down very quickly.

At first, the concept will feel strange, especially because it a larger cube than what you are used to. You will need to figure out and understand how to solve the centers without messing up the other centers, but once you get that, it becomes an extremely fun cube. I personally want to keep getting the next big cube to add to my collection, because I’m adding a layer of difficulty.

The process is to match up all of your centers, pair up your edges, and then solving as if it were a typical 3×3 speed cube.

I have a tutorial for the 4×4 that you can go to! Just go to my How To Solve The 4×4 tutorial page to find out how!

The Things To Watch Out For

I encourage you to learn how to solve larger cubes because they are a blast to work with, but you do need to know a few things before you take the plunge.

If you go with a 4×4, 6×6, or any other even-numbered cube, they will not have a fixed center piece. This means you will have to know how the color scheme is to a new level. If you don’t get that down, you can misplace a center piece and end up having to start over if you get too far. I have a method that I use to make sure I know the color scheme by heart, so whatever your method, you will want to practice it as you go to make sure you don’t forget it.

The larger cubes also have a thing called a parity error. Because of their larger size, there is room for the cube to not orientate correctly. Luckily, there are algorithms that can solve them as you go through the steps, so you don’t have to start over when they show up. And the bright side is that the algorithms work with every size puzzle that you decide to learn. You will actually know all of the algorithms required to solve anything above a 5×5 because they all become the same method at a larger scale. 

This goes without saying, but because of the fluid centers on them, even-numbered cubes are statistically harder to solve than an odd-numbered cube, but they are not that much more challenging so I encourage you to learn whatever cube you want to. The more you know, the more fun it becomes, right?

You will actually know all of the algorithms required to solve anything above a 5×5…

If you are wanting to transition into the larger cubes, I recommend researching the different cubes that are out there to find the cube that is perfect for you. I have several cube reviews on my site that you can check out. If you have any questions about anything listed above, don’t hesitate to comment on this post or send me an email. I love hearing from you and want to provide the best resources for you.

With all of that said, you will be able to jump in and have a blast learning how to solve larger cubes. They add a layer of challenge and fun (pun intended) so take every opportunity and learn everything you can about this new facet of cubing.

Keep on cubing!